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Falling Leaves and High Notes

10th Oct 2010

This Saturday we were delighted to perform our renowned singing waiters act for a wedding in a beautiful private venue in Surrey. The groom contacted us several months before the big day to find out whether we could tailor a surprise performance for his fiancée and their 150 guests.
 
We created a performance which included singing waiters and surprise hidden guests. We also worked with the groom to include repertoire that was both meaningful to the couple and entertaining for all the guests to ensure the singing waiters performance was truly unique.

The weather was fantastic this weekend and the marquee was set in the stunning gardens of a private home near Headley. Headley is mentioned as far back as the Domesday Book of the 11th century. It is high up on the Downs and set within rolling grass slopes, heath and woodland, so you could not ask for a more idyllic setting for a marquee wedding on a mild early October day.
 
Following the drinks reception in the gardens, the wedding party moved into the marquee for their wedding breakfast. As the best man finished his speech, one by one, our singing waiters and hidden guests revealed themselves to the amazement and roar of the guests. Our ruse had completely fooled everyone and the experience of hearing and seeing world class opera singers who have stepped off the stages of the Royal Opera House, English National Opera and Glyndebourne left an unforgettable impression on everyone.  It’s always so satisfying to see a room full of smiles and happiness.
 
And what did the groom think? “The whole performance was superb. My wife was delighted and the rest of the guests were blown over by it! Thank you so so much”.
 
And now for our weekly interesting fact, did you know that the world record for the longest applause was recorded at the Vienna Staatsoper on the warm summer evening of July 30, 1991, for one hour and 20 minutes, setting a new record for the world's longest applause ever. The audience, who had just revelled in a performance of a lifetime by Placido Domingo in Otello, responded by rising to their feet and clapping through encore after encore - 101 curtain calls to be exact! 



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